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Brad Jenkins

Brad Jenkins, President and CEO of CloudNine Discovery, has over 20 years of experience leading customer focused companies in the litigation support arena. Brad has authored many articles on litigation support issues, and has spoken before national audiences on document management practices and solutions.

Doug Austin

Doug Austin, Professional Services Manager for CloudNine Discovery, has over 20 years experience providing legal technology consulting and technical project management services to numerous commercial and government clients. Doug has also authored several articles on eDiscovery best practices.

Jane Gennarelli

Jane Gennarelli is a principal of Magellan’s Law Corporation and has been assisting litigators in effectively handling discovery materials for over 30 years. She authored the company’s Best Practices in a Box™ content product and assists firms in applying technology to document handling tasks. She is a known expert and often does webinars and presentations for litigation support professionals around the country. Jane can be reached by email at jane@litigationbestpractices.com.

$2.9 Billion? Gartner Predicts eDiscovery Software Market to Double by 2017 – eDiscovery Trends

January 07, 2013

By Doug Austin

 

As reported by Evan Koblentz in Law Technology News, electronic data discovery software sales reached $1.4 billion worldwide in 2012 and will reach $2.9 billion by 2017 according to Gartner Inc.  Their latest forecast for the eDiscovery industry is discussed in Forecast: Enterprise E-Discovery Software, Worldwide, 2012-2017, available here.

As noted in the summary to the report (not surprisingly), “[d]ouble-digit revenue growth is expected because of increased litigation and ever-expanding volumes of content and data that must be searched”.  Some notable statistics:

  • According to Gartner’s prediction, the eDiscovery software market is expected to grow by more than 15 percent annually over the next five years.  This is more than twice the growth rate for overall business software, which is growing at less than 7 percent annually.
  • Last year, Gartner forecasted $1.5 billion in eDiscovery software sales for 2013.  That figure has been raised to $1.67 billion in the latest report.
  • Part of the reason for increased growth is an increase in the international market.  According to Gartner’s evaluation of 2011 data, 82 percent of eDiscovery software revenue came from North America, 12 percent from Europe, the Middle East, and Africa, 5 percent from the Asia-Pacific region, and 1 percent from Latin America.  That’s a 5 percent rise in revenue in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa and a 3 percent rise in the Asia-Pacific region since 2008.

The report can be purchased here for $1,495.

Of course, the Gartner forecast is considerably different from this forecast from last August.

So, what do you think?  Do you think the Gartner forecast is reasonable, or perhaps possibly even too conservative?  Please share any comments you might have or if you’d like to know more about a particular topic.

Disclaimer: The views represented herein are exclusively the views of the author, and do not necessarily represent the views held by CloudNine Discovery. eDiscoveryDaily is made available by CloudNine Discovery solely for educational purposes to provide general information about general eDiscovery principles and not to provide specific legal advice applicable to any particular circumstance. eDiscoveryDaily should not be used as a substitute for competent legal advice from a lawyer you have retained and who has agreed to represent you.
http://www.cloudninediscovery.com/ondemand/free-software-trial.aspx

Comments

  • January 07, 2013 Craig Ball

    Not so different, as I read the numbers. Gartner says $2.9 billion for software globally by 2017 and the other report projects says $2.5 billion. $400mm isn't chump change, but it's not a notable divergence for a five-year projection. Autonomy's fate alone injects at least that much uncertainty.

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