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About the Bloggers

Brad Jenkins

Brad Jenkins, President and CEO of CloudNine Discovery, has over 20 years of experience leading customer focused companies in the litigation support arena. Brad has authored many articles on litigation support issues, and has spoken before national audiences on document management practices and solutions.

Doug Austin

Doug Austin, Professional Services Manager for CloudNine Discovery, has over 20 years experience providing legal technology consulting and technical project management services to numerous commercial and government clients. Doug has also authored several articles on eDiscovery best practices.

Jane Gennarelli

Jane Gennarelli is a principal of Magellan’s Law Corporation and has been assisting litigators in effectively handling discovery materials for over 30 years. She authored the company’s Best Practices in a Box™ content product and assists firms in applying technology to document handling tasks. She is a known expert and often does webinars and presentations for litigation support professionals around the country. Jane can be reached by email at jane@litigationbestpractices.com.

Review

Are You Scared Yet? – eDiscovery Horrors!

October 31, 2013

By Doug Austin

Today is Halloween. Every year at this time, because (after all) we’re an eDiscovery blog, we try to “scare” you with tales of eDiscovery horrors. So, I have one question: Are you scared yet?

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Plaintiffs’ Supreme Effort to Recuse Judge Peck in Da Silva Moore Denied – eDiscovery Case Law

October 30, 2013

By Doug Austin

As we discussed back in July, attorneys representing lead plaintiff Monique Da Silva Moore and five other employees filed a petition for a writ of certiorari with the US Supreme Court arguing that New York Magistrate Judge Andrew Peck, who approved an eDiscovery protocol agreed to by the parties that included predictive coding technology, should have recused himself given his previous public statements expressing strong support of predictive coding. Earlier this month, on October 7, that petition was denied by the Supreme Court.

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What is “Reduping?” – eDiscovery Explained

October 28, 2013

By Doug Austin

As emails are sent out to multiple custodians, deduplication (or “deduping”) has become a common practice to eliminate multiple copies of the same email or file from the review collection, saving considerable review costs and ensuring consistency by not having different reviewers apply different responsiveness or privilege determinations to the same file. Everyone who works in electronic discovery knows what “deduping” is. But how many of you know what “reduping” is?

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For Successful Discovery, Think Backwards – eDiscovery Best Practices

October 08, 2013

By Doug Austin

The Electronic Discovery Reference Model (EDRM) has become the standard model for the workflow of the process for handling electronically stored information (ESI) in discovery. But, to succeed in discovery, regardless whether you’re the producing party or the receiving party, it might be helpful to think about the EDRM model backwards.

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Is a Blended Document Review Rate of $466 Per Hour Excessive? – eDiscovery Case Law

September 23, 2013

By Doug Austin

Remember when we raised the question as to whether it is time to ditch the per hour model for document review? One of the cases we highlighted for perceived overbilling was ruled upon last month. In the case In re Citigroup Inc. Securities Litigation, New York District Judge Sidney H. Stein rejected as unreasonable the plaintiffs’ lead counsel’s proffered blended rate of more than $400 for contract attorneys—more than the blended rate charged for associate attorneys—most of whom were tasked with routine document review work.

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eDiscovery Daily is Three Years Old!

September 20, 2013

By Doug Austin

We’ve always been free, now we are three! It’s hard to believe that it has been three years ago today since we launched the eDiscoveryDaily blog. We’re past the “terrible twos” and heading towards pre-school. Before you know it, we’ll be ready to take our driver’s test! Here are some posts over the last six months you may have missed.

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Everything You Wanted to Know about Technology Assisted Review – eDiscovery Trends

August 29, 2013

By Doug Austin

Rob Robinson has put together another terrific compilation, this time a compilation of articles about Technology Assisted Review and Predictive Coding over the past 1 1/2 years (from February 2012, last updated on August 12). If you simply can’t get enough of the topic, you’ll want to check it out.

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How Big is Your ESI Collection, Really? – eDiscovery Best Practices

August 26, 2013

By Doug Austin

After identifying custodians relevant to the case and collecting files from each, you’ve collected roughly 100 gigabytes (GB) of Microsoft Outlook email PST files and loose electronic files from the custodians. You identify a vendor to process the files to load into a review tool, so that you can perform review and produce the files to opposing counsel. After processing, the vendor sends you a bill – and they’ve charged you to process over 200 GB!! Are they trying to overbill you?

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A Technical Explanation of Near-Dupes – eDiscovery Tutorial

August 09, 2013

By Doug Austin

Bill Dimm provides a comprehensive and interesting description of near-dupes and the algorithms used to identify them in his Clustify blog (What is a near-dupe, really?). If you want to understand the “three reasonable, but different, ways of defining the near-dupe similarity between two documents”, bring your brain and check it out.

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Data May Be Doubling Every Couple of Years, But How Much of it is Original? – eDiscovery Best Practices

July 31, 2013

By Doug Austin

According to the Compliance, Governance and Oversight Council (CGOC), information volume in most organizations doubles every 18-24 months. However, just because it doubles doesn’t mean that it’s all original. Like a bad cover band singing Free Bird, the rendition may be unique, but the content is the same. The key is limiting review to unique content.

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Good Processing Requires a Sound Process – eDiscovery Best Practices

July 26, 2013

By Doug Austin

As we discussed yesterday, working with electronic files in a review tool is NOT just simply a matter of loading the files and getting started. Electronic files are diverse and can represent a whole collection of issues to address in order to process them for loading. To address those issues effectively, processing requires a sound process.

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The Files are Already Electronic, How Hard Can They Be to Load? – eDiscovery Best Practices

July 25, 2013

By Doug Austin

Since hard copy discovery became electronic discovery, I’ve worked with a number of clients who expect that working with electronic files in a review tool is simply a matter of loading the files and getting started. Unfortunately, it’s not that simple!

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Plaintiffs Take the Supreme Step in Da Silva Moore – eDiscovery Case Law

July 12, 2013

By Doug Austin

As mentioned in Law Technology News ('Da Silva Moore' Goes to Washington), attorneys representing lead plaintiff Monique Da Silva Moore and five other employees have filed a petition for certiorari filed with the Supreme Court arguing that New York Magistrate Judge Andrew Peck, who approved an eDiscovery protocol agreed to by the parties that included predictive coding technology, should have recused himself given his previous public statements expressing strong support of predictive coding.

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“Not Me”, The Fallibility of Human Review – eDiscovery Best Practices

June 20, 2013

By Doug Austin

When I talk with attorneys about using technology to assist with review (whether via techniques such as predictive coding or merely advanced searching and culling mechanisms), most of them still seem to question whether these techniques can measure up to good, old-fashioned human attorney review. Despite several studies that question the accuracy of human review, many attorneys still feel that their review capability is as good or better than technical approaches. Here is perhaps the best explanation yet why that may not be the case.

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Motion to Compel Dismissed after Defendant Agrees to Conditional Meet and Confer – eDiscovery Case Law

June 11, 2013

By Doug Austin

In Gordon v. Kaleida Health, New York Magistrate Judge Leslie G. Foschio dismissed (without prejudice) the plaintiffs’ motion to compel the defendant to meet and confer to establish an agreed protocol for implementing the use of predictive coding software after the defendants stated that they were prepared to meet and confer with the plaintiffs and their non-disqualified ESI consultants regarding the defendants' predictive coding process.

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Important Considerations when Negotiating Search Terms with Opposing Counsel – eDiscovery Best Practices

June 06, 2013

By Doug Austin

Negotiating search terms with opposing counsel has become commonplace to agree on the scope of discovery. However, when you negotiate terms with the other side, you could be agreeing to produce more than you think. Craig Ball’s latest article in Law Technology News discusses the issues and tries to answer the question: Are Keywords Just Filters?

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200,000 Visits on eDiscovery Daily! – eDiscovery Milestones

June 03, 2013

By Doug Austin

While we may be “just a bit behind” Google in popularity (900 million visits per month), we’re proud to announce that yesterday eDiscoveryDaily reached the 200,000 visit milestone! It took us a little over 21 months to reach 100,000 visits and just over 11 months to get to 200,000 (don’t tell my boss, he’ll expect 300,000 in 5 1/2 months). When we reach key milestones, we like to take a look back at some of the recent stories we’ve covered, so here are some recent eDiscovery items of interest.

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Never Mind! Plaintiffs Not Required to Use Predictive Coding After All – eDiscovery Case Law

May 28, 2013

By Doug Austin

Remember EORHB v. HOA Holdings, where, in a surprise ruling, both parties were instructed to use predictive coding by the judge? Well, the judge has changed his mind.

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More Updates from the EDRM Annual Meeting – eDiscovery Trends

May 10, 2013

By Doug Austin

Yesterday, we discussed some general observations from the Annual Meeting for the Electronic Discovery Reference Model (EDRM) group and discussed some significant efforts and accomplishments by the (suddenly heavily talked about) EDRM Data Set project. Here are some updates from other projects within EDRM.

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Reporting from the EDRM Annual Meeting and a Data Set Update – eDiscovery Trends

May 09, 2013

By Doug Austin

The Electronic Discovery Reference Model (EDRM) Project was created in May 2005 by George Socha of Socha Consulting LLC and Tom Gelbmann of Gelbmann & Associates to address the lack of standards and guidelines in the electronic discovery market. Now, beginning its ninth year of operation with its annual meeting in St. Paul, MN, EDRM is accomplishing more than ever to address those needs. Here are some highlights from the meeting, and an update regarding the (suddenly heavily talked about) EDRM Data Set project.

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Plaintiffs’ Objections to Defendant’s Use of Keyword Search before Predictive Coding Rejected – eDiscovery Case Law

April 23, 2013

By Doug Austin

In the caseIn Re: Biomet M2a Magnum Hip Implant Products Liability Litigation (MDL 2391), the Plaintiffs’ Steering Committee in a Multi District Litigation objected to the defendant’s use of keyword searching prior to performing predictive coding and requested that the defendant go back to its original set of 19.5 million documents and repeat the predictive coding without performing keyword searching. Indiana District Judge Robert L. Miller, Jr. denied the request.

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Appeals Court Upholds Decision Not to Recuse Judge Peck in Da Silva Moore – eDiscovery Case Law

April 15, 2013

By Doug Austin

As reported by IT-Lex, the Second Circuit of the US Court of Appeals rejected the Plaintiff’s request for a writ of mandamus recusing Magistrate Judge Andrew J. Peck from Da Silva Moore v. Publicis Groupe SA.

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